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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
I so regret what is happening. I will do everything I can to prevent this program from being canceled out. There's going to be a bill in my committee to do it. There's a bill in this committee to do it. And unfortunately, very few of us sat on that committee when George Tenet came in, in June of 2001 and said we anticipate a strike, but we don’t know what
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
(George Tenet came in in June of 2001 and said we anticipate a strike, but we don't know what. We don’t know where. We don't know when. That can never be allowed to happen in the United States of America again. That's the basis for this program. It is legal. We are looking at increased transparency. We are looking to make some changes in it. But we are not looking to destroy it. To destroy it is to make this nation more vulnerable.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
problem in this debate., and that's the fact that despite the large amount of Americans information being collected under the foreign intelligence law those laws lack any substantial public reporting requirements. The government doesn’t have to give even a rough estimate of how many American’s information is being collected. it doesn't have to tell Americans how much of their information is actually seen by national security officials.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
they have no way of knowing if we're getting that balance right. My bill would change this. It would make the government give annual statistics on the number of America's information collected. and the number whose information is actually reviewed. It would also let companies disclose agreements and disclose aggregate statistics on the number of requests they get and the number of accounts affected.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
I'm very pleased to report that yesterday morning America's leading tech companies from Apple to Google, to Microsoft, to Facebook and Twitter to Yahoo!, all of these companies sent a letter supporting my bill urging this committee and Congress to pass it.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
There has to be limits on the surveillance powers we give to the government. Just because something is technologically possible and just because something may be deemed technically legal does not mean it is the right thing to do.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
This summer many Americans learned for the first time section 215 of the U.S. Patriot Act that for years has been secretly interpreted to authorize the collection of Americans’ phone numbers on an unprecedented scale. The American public also learned more about the government's collection of internet content data through the use of section 702 of FISA. Since the committee’s last hearing on these revelations in late July we have learned a great deal more.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
We have learned the NSA has engaged in repeated, substantial, legal violations in its implementations of both Section 215 and section 702 of FISA. For example the NSA collected, without a warrant, the content of tens of thousands of –emails of wholly innocent Americans.
Jeff Flake
U.S. Senator, R-Arizona
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Flake: General Alexander, last June I questioned the FBI director with regard to retention of data collected under, the metadata under 215. He testified that the data collected under 215 is scrubbed every five years or after five years, i think on a rolling basis. Is all metadata collected under other authorities also discarded after five years?
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake 5 yr. data scrubbed?): For NSA, it depends on the type of data. So in the metadata repository for 215, as you stated, aged off after five years by court direction. If there's a report, that, of course, would not be aged off that report will stand just like other intelligence activities.
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